Jesse Rose Fabriclive 85 - XLR8R

Jesse Rose Fabriclive 85

A seasoned pro's clubland savvy shines through on the latest offering from this long-running series.
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jesse rose fabriclive 85

Jesse Rose takes the smorgasbord approach on the latest from the Fabriclive DJ-mix series, offering as many tasty house-music fusions as possible in his 75-minute presentation. Recorded live to mirror his sets, disco-fueled grooves slide smoothly into glittering synthy numbers; jacking vocal tracks shuffle next to sparse, moody tech beats. Rose, who splits time between homes in Barcelona and Los Angeles amid a hectic world-traveling DJ schedule, blends each track as patiently as he would during a three-hour headlining gig in Berlin. Instrumentals and vocals share equal billing, with the selection drawing from his own labels (Play It Down and A-SIDED) and tracks featuring friends and production comrades.

After a trippy spoken word ode to getting high by Ed Weathers, the set opens up with Black Rose collaborative partner Henrik Schwarz’s “Leave My Head Alone Brain (Mix 5),” a funky, conga-fueled track that sets the tone with its exuberant bass riffs and pumping rhythm. Next, Berlin producer Sqim’s “White Flakes” features a loopy vocal that urges us to “burn it all night long,” which seems an apt metaphor for the intensity Rose injects into this selection. Building on that spirit, he lets Johnny D’s Aretha Franklin-sampling “Believer” roll along for half of its 13-minute duration, which allows ample time for track’s hypnotic chords to sink in.

The mix travels through shifting moods, from the sharp, echoing stabs and sweeping strings of Induceve’s “Papillion” to the ravey, euphoric chords of Kyodai's “Sin City.” Dark and dirty late-night warehouse jams (Gene FarrisThe Way U Like”) and warm, melodic tracks (Ian Pooley’s “Don’t You Be Afraid”) offer balance. Elsewhere, we hear uplifting, soul-drenched vocals on house classics from Urban Soul and inspired closing track “The Word Is Love” by Steve "Silk" Hurley. Rose also provides big arcing sparks with the joyous self-produced “It’s Not Over” featuring Ninja Tune vocalist Seven Davis, Jr.

This is a mix where Rose’s veteran experience counts: The hundreds of nights spent behind the decks and tweaking the studio boards, the fruitful interactions with artists around the world, and the knowledge of dance music’s fertile history adds up to a distinctive and entertaining presentation. Thanks to his lack of sleep and battered ears, Rose can rest easy knowing that his experiences have conjured a golden mix.